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Trails in the Scapegoat Wilderness, MT

And into the forest I go, to lose my mind and find my soul


The Scapegoat Wilderness-Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex
is located in Northwestern Montana on both sides of the Continental Divide. This large complex includes three Wilderness areas: the Great Bear, the Scapegoat, and the Bob Marshall Wilderness. Together the Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex makes up an area of more than 1.5 million acres, the third largest in the lower 48 states. Grizzly bear, lynx, wolverine, deer, elk, gray wolf, moose, black bear, mountain lion, mountain goat, and mountain sheep roam about these rugged ridge tops, gently sloping alpine meadows, thickly forested river bottoms and open grass parks.

The United States Congress designated the Scapegoat Wilderness (map) in 1972 and it now has a total of 259,993 acres. All of this wilderness is located in Montana and is managed by the Forest Service. The Scapegoat Wilderness is bordered by the Bob Marshall Wilderness to the north.

The Scapegoat Wilderness contains approximately 320 miles of trails and is dominated by the massive limestone cliffs of the 9,204-foot Scapegoat Mountain that extends south from the Bob Marshall's Chinese Wall.  Elevations range from 5,000 feet on the North Fork of the Blackfoot River to 9,400 feet on Red Mountain, the highest peak in the Complex. The Scapegoat Wilderness is approximately 32 miles long and ranges from 4 to 24 miles in width.  Most of the 14 lakes and about 89 miles of streams in the Scapegoat provide fishing opportunities.  Primitive camping is allowed with no public facilities.  Call Lewis and Clark National Forest for camping information.

 
Scapegoat Wilderness Sign Helena National Forest

 


Hobnail Tom Trail, el. 7,000 feet